Photography by Ian L. Sitren

Posts tagged “Japanese Zero

Mustang And Zero

Not something you see everyday for sure! The P-51 Mustang “Bunny” and a Japanese Zero starting up and headed out for the El Centro Air Show. Leaving the Palm Springs Air Museum where “Bunny” calls home, dedicated to Tuskegee Airmen Lt. Col. Bob Friend.

 


The Tread Mark On My Hat

Pilot Tom Nightingale almost left a tire tread mark on my hat as he did a low flyover at the Palm Springs Air Museum yesterday. What a great airplane too, wow! A 1943 North American SNJ-4 Texan Navy trainer. Also designated the T-6 Texan it is an airplane often seen in movies portraying the Japanese Zero. Get yourself out to the Palm Springs Air Museum, one of the best in the entire USA!

Texan Flyover


Pearl Harbor Commemorative Fly By

Attack on Pearl Harbor Commemorative Fly By of a Japanese Zero Fighter and VAL Dive Bomber at the Palm Springs Air Museum 2015. Zero Pilot Robert “Lips” Hertberg and VAL Pilot Tom Nightingale.

Video photographed on FujiFilm X-Series Cameras and Lenses

One of only three World War II Japanese Zero’s still flying in the entire world. This Zero, owned and operated by the Commemorative Air Force, was delivered to the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Group #3. It originally had an air cooled rotary engine producing 1,130 hp and a top speed of 388 mph at almost 20,000 feet. In the flight demonstration you could easily see it’s nimble and powerful maneuverability.

The Aichi D3A Dive Bomber, nicknamed “Val”, was the aircraft carrier borne airplane that flew in almost all actions, including Pearl Harbor to the end of World War II. It was responsible for sinking more Allied warships than any other aircraft. This replica flying out of the Palm Springs Air Museum was flown in both the movies “Tora! Tora! Tora!” and “Pearl Harbor”.


A Date Which Will Live In Infamy

Yesterday, in commemoration of the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, the Palm Springs Air Museum flew the two aircraft of the attack. The Japanese VAL Dive Bomber and Zero Fighter. As well, a definitive historical presentation of the attack by historian Michael Carra. The Palm Springs Air Museum is the place for “Living History”.

Peearl Harbor Attack

Photographed with FujiFilm X series camera and lens

President Franklin D. Roosevelt: Yesterday, December 7, 1941—a date which will live in infamy—the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.

The United States was at peace with that nation, and, at the solicitation of Japan, was still in conversation with its government and its emperor looking toward the maintenance of peace in the Pacific. Indeed, one hour after Japanese air squadrons had commenced bombing in the American island of Oahu, the Japanese ambassador to the United States and his colleague delivered to our secretary of state a formal reply to a recent American message. While this reply stated that it seemed useless to continue the existing diplomatic negotiations, it contained no threat or hint of war or armed attack.

It will be recorded that the distance of Hawaii from Japan makes it obvious that the attack was deliberately planned many days or even weeks ago. During the intervening time the Japanese government has deliberately sought to deceive the United States by false statements and expressions of hope for continued peace.

The attack yesterday on the Hawaiian Islands has caused severe damage to American naval and military forces. I regret to tell you that very many American lives have been lost. In addition, American ships have been reported torpedoed on the high seas between San Francisco and Honolulu.

Yesterday the Japanese government also launched as attack against Malaya.

Last night Japanese forces attacked Hong Kong.

Last night Japanese forces attacked Guam.

Last night Japanese forces attacked the Philippine Islands.

Last night Japanese forces attacked Wake Island.

And this morning the Japanese attacked Midway Island.

Japan has, therefore, undertaken a surprise offensive extending throughout the Pacific area. The facts of yesterday and today speak for themselves. The people of the United States have already formed their opinions and well understand the implications to the very life and safety of our nation.

As commander in chief of the Army and Navy I have directed that all measures be taken for our defense. But always will our whole nation remember the character of the onslaught against us. . .

Source: Courtesy of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York.


Zero Fighter & VAL Dive Bomber!

Sunday at the Palm Springs Air Museum, it will be a commemoration of the events of December 7th 1941 with the flying of a Japanese Zero fighter and the VAL dive bomber. The flyover will be at 10:49AM. Between 1 – 2PM the presentation “Pearl Harbor – Attack on Battleship Row: the event that changed Naval and World history.” followed by another aircraft fly over. There are only 3 still flying Zero’s in the world and the VAL is almost nonexistent. So be there! Here is a video of the Zero and the VAL from last year…


Image

One Of Only Three Zero’s Still Flying In The World

One Of Only Three Zero's Still Flying In The World

One of only three World War II Japanese Zero’s still flying in the entire world. In the skies over the Palm Springs Airport courtesy of the Palm Springs Air Museum earlier today. This Zero, owned and operated by the Commemorative Air Force, was delivered to the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Group #3. It originally had an air cooled rotary engine producing 1,130 hp and a top speed of 388 mph at almost 20,000 feet. In today’s flight demonstration you could easily see it’s nimble and powerful maneuverability. I also have video which I will post here in the next day or two. Very Fun! Here is the video I shot of the Zero starting up and heading out to taxi.  https://vimeo.com/93085158